Charleston Stories

ROBERT SMALLS – 1839 – 1915

Although born and raised a slave, Robert Smalls became the most famous African-American Charlestonian during the Civil War. Robert was born slave in Beaufort, S.C. and went on to become a most talented ship pilot. His talents were needed in Charleston during the Civil War and his owner, a Mr. McKee, sent Robert to work…

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The Second Presbyterian Church

Situated on one of the highest points in the City, “The Second Presbyterian Church of Charleston and Its Suburbs”, was completed on April 3, 1811 in order to accommodate the growing congregation of the First (Scots) Presbyterian Church, which itself was founded in 1731 and had outgrown its house of worship. Conceived in In 1809,…

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The Great Charleston Fire of 1861

On the evening of December 11, 1861, as a cold front bearing high winds swept into Charleston from the northeast, a fire started near the intersection of East Bay and Hasell Streets, about where Harris-Teeter is now located. The origin is not for certain, but many accounts attribute it to some slave refugees who had…

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White Point Garden

Located on the tip of the Charleston Peninsula, this 6.54 acre park provides a spectacular view of Fort Sumter and Charleston Harbor, where the Ashley and Cooper rivers empty into the Atlantic Ocean. The park was originally known as Oyster Point and later White Point because of the piles of sun-bleached oyster shells found at…

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Bombardment Of Charleston 1863-65

After the occupation of Ft. Sumter in Charleston harbor by Confederate troops in early 1861, the U.S. was focused on regaining control of our harbor in a slow, methodical campaign which would last until the end of the war. After an attack by Union ironclad ships in 1863 failed to gain control of Ft. Sumter,…

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Two Meeting Street

At the intersection of Meeting and South Battery Streets, on the edge of White Point Gardens, sits 2 Meeting Street, an outstanding Queen Anne style house was built in 1892 for Waring P. Carrington and his wife, Martha, a daughter of George W. Williams, a wealthy banker who lived at 16 Meeting St. Tradition says…

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St. Michael’s Alley

Charleston’s alleys are highly historical and enchanting places.  Much has been written about Dueler’s (Philadelphia), Lodge, and Stoll’s Alleys.  I would like to comment on another, out of the way, passage known as St. Michael’s Alley which connects Meeting with Church Streets.  In about 150 yards there is as much history per square inch as any other place…

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The Charleston Museum

The Charleston Museum was founded by the Charleston Library Society in 1773 while South Carolina was yet a British colony. Commonly regarded as “America’s First Museum”, many of the original collections were destroyed by fire in 1778 and operations were suspended during the American Revolution, however, collecting resumed in the 1790s. In 1824 the Museum…

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Robert William Roper House

I hope you enjoy these photos of the Robert William Roper House, located at 9 East Battery Street. Declared a National Historic Landmark in 1973, the Roper House is one of Charleston’s most beautiful Greek Revival houses. Robert William Roper, a prominent cotton planter, built this…

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The Edmondston-Alston House

Enjoyed a tour of the Edmondston-Alston House today. Despite the rain, and wind, it was a beautiful house tour. The House was one of the first dwellings built in the newly created neighborhood in 1825. Although photos are not allowed inside of the House, I’ve included a few of the exterior below. For more information…

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